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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Jonathan Landay
Senior National Security and intelligence Correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers
MSNBCW 07/31/2014
Landay: So according to the CIA, John Brennan, because of the seriousness of Senator Feinstein's allegations, asked the CIA Inspector General David Buckley to conduct an internal review of the allegations. And what Buckley came up with was the fact is are findings that a number of CIA officials, attorneys and IT specialists inappropriately accessed a database that was supposed to be accessed only by the senate committee staff by agreement of the CIA. Now I think the CIA will dispute the way a lot of people are interpreting the finding here
John Brennan
Director of the CIA
MSNBCW 07/31/2014
Landay: The question is whether or not the CIA had hacked into this computer in an effort to thwart the committee's investigation and John Brennan said absolutely not. The definition of the word hack may be what's at play here because at least as far as the CIA is concerned they can't hack into their own computer system. This was a system that the CIA provided to the Senate staff, but I suspect that a lot of people are going to say that's splitting hairs and indeed, the CIA did hack into this system to determine whether or not the CIA had an internal review of the interrogation program, that according to Senator Feinstein and others, actually confirmed the findings of the Senate's own report.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 07/31/2014
Wagner: Senator Udall issued a statement that says ”I have lost confidence in John Brennan. I am concerned about the director's apparent inability to find any flaws in the agency he leads.” The White House is defending John Brennan, but one would imagine that the Senators on this intelligence committee are not going to let it simply end here with an apology from John Brennan. Landay: Well, I suspect not. Because you've already had several senators including Senator Wyden demanding to know, having a clear accountability of what happened, who, perhaps, ordered this intrusion. How it happened. I think there will probably be some internal wrangling over this, because look, the White House has said, John Brennan has said, and a lot of people on Capitol Hill have said they want to get this report out and put this entire matter behind them.
Jonathan Landay
Senior National Security and intelligence Correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers
MSNBCW 07/31/2014
Wagner: (from the leaked state department talking points on this report) One of the questions is doesn't the report, the senate intelligence report, make clear that at least some who authorized or participated in the rendition, detention and interrogation program committed crimes? They ask again, whether the justice department will revisit the decision not to prosecute anyone. There could be criminal charges here, Jonathan. Landay: We'll have to wait and see and the state department of course, is going to have to answer overseas to other governments demanding to know what's in this report. there are governments that will be implicated in this report for hosting black sites and also it's very curious because you know, when the justice department issued its statement saying that it has no -- insufficient evidence to pursue criminal investigations, it added, quote,” at this time” unquote. Wagner: indeed. Landay: And so, indeed, it appears to have left the door open for possible -- for a possible further investigation of this matter.
Jonathan Landay
Senior National Security and intelligence Correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers
LINKTV 08/29/2014
Landay: What we found out from the Snowden disclosures is that the United States Government is collecting all of our metadata which shows who your social and professional networks are, where your connections are, where you are at a particular time, where, perhaps, a source is. They do not need to know what you were talking about. They’ve got enough to be able to go to your source to say why were you talking to this journalist. When it comes to protecting a source, I’ve had to teach myself using an encryption engine, this kind of thing. I don’t take my iphone with me when I go to meet a source. Unless you take the battery out, you can still be tracked. I was leaked classified intelligence community documents last year that cataloged quite a few years of U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan. I went to considerable lengths to protect my source and I’m not going to tell you what I did.
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